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LOX-DB - Literature


Opposing effects of 15-lipoxygenase-1 and -2 metabolites on MAPK signaling in prostate: alteration in PPARgamma.

Hsi LC, Wilson LC, Eling TE.

J Biol Chem 277: 40549-40556 (2002)

Abstract:

Human prostate tumors have elevated levels of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) and data suggests that 15-LOX-1 may play a role in the development of prostate cancer. In contrast, 15-LOX-2 expression is higher in normal rather than in tumor prostate tissue and appears to suppress cancer development. We recently reported that 13-(S)-HODE, the 15-LOX-1 metabolite, up-regulates the MAP kinase signaling pathway and subsequently down-regulates PPARg in human colorectal carcinoma cells. To determine whether this mechanism is applicable to prostate cancer and what the effects of 15-LOX-2 are, we investigated the effect of 15-LOX-1, 15-LOX-2 and their metabolites on EGF- and IGF-1-signaling in prostate carcinoma cells. In PC3 cells, 13-(S)-HODE, a 15-LOX-1 metabolite, up-regulated MAP kinase while in contrast 15-(S)-HETE, a 15-LOX-2 metabolite, down-regulated MAP kinase. As a result, 13-(S)-HODE increased PPARg phosphorylation while a subsequent decrease in PPARg phosphorylation was observed with 15-(S)-HETE. Thus, 15-LOX metabolites have opposing effects on the regulation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway and a downstream target of MAP kinase signaling like PPARg. In addition to the EGF signaling pathway, the IGF-signaling pathway appears to be linked to prostate cancer. 13-(S)-HODE and 15-(S)-HETE up-regulate or down-regulate respectively both the MAPK and Akt pathways after activation with IGF-1. Thus, the effect of these lipid metabolites is not solely restricted to EGF-signaling and not solely restricted to MAPK-signaling. These results provide a plausible mechanism to explain the apparent opposing effects 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 play in prostate cancer.